Mochar Ghonto(Banana flower cooked with aromatic spices)

This dish is very dear to Bengalis and though it takes long to remove the stamens and stigma and chop them fine,we still manage to go through all hurdles to endure the end result which is worth the wait. Thanks to the home delivery of vegetables, we now get it peeled and just ready to be chopped. This is eaten with plain rice and is little sweet which is not exactly new to Bengali cuisine. The sweetness balances the tartness of the banana flower.

Ingredients

  1. 1 banana flower (peeled, stamens removed and chopped)
  2. 4 tbsps of freshly grated coconut
  3. 1 cinnamon stick, 4 cloves, 2 green cardamoms, 2 bay leaves, 1 dried red chilli
  4. A pinch of turmeric powder
  5. 2 tbsps of ghee or clarified butter
  6. 1 small tablet sized tamarind ball (seedless)
  7. 1 tbsp of freshly squeezed ginger juice
  8. 2 tbsps of fresh cream
  9. Garam masala powder
  10. Slit green chillies
  11. Salt and sugar to taste.

Procedure

  1. Wash and drain the chopped banana flowers and transfer it to a pressure cooker with tamarind , salt and turmeric powder and half a cup of water.
  2. After one whistle, let it cool down and drain the water and slightly mash the flowers with a fork.
  3. Add ghee to a wok and put all the whole spices and once they start to crackle, add the flowers.
  4. Saute and keep adding all the ingredients except grated coconut.
  5. Stir fry on medium flame until the aroma of ghee, fresh cream and spices fill your kitchen.
  6. Once it is dry, transfer it to a plate and garnish it with grated coconut.
  7. It is ready to serve.
  8. Cooking of this recipe varies from kitchen to kitchen. Many add potatoes but I personally do not like potatoes in this dish.

 Cabbage and potato Cooked in Bengali Style

This recipe is typical of bengali households barring the fact that some love to have it little sweet. My version is not sweet though. I strongly believe that the cutting of this vegetable plays a very important role in enhancing the taste. I have shown in the pics below as to how I exactly cut it. I tried  using the food processor,  but that didn’t work very well as it affects the look of the ready dish. And as I always believe that, its your eyes that eat first. 

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 Fish cooked in mustard gravy( Macher Jhaal) 

Traditionally, Bengal has been renowned for its extraordinarily fertile agricultural land and production of paddy. At the same time, the rivers of Bengal are an apparently inexhaustible resource of different varieties of fish. That is why, since the ancient times, rice and fish emerged as the staple food for the Bengalis. Each variety  of fresh water fish involve a different way of being cooked and different set of masalas. In one of my previous posts, I have mentioned how to make a mustard paste. The mustard powder I have used in this particular recipe is a dry mix which can be kept in the fridge for years.This fish known as Rui in Bengali  and comes in all sizes begining from 500 gms to 10 kgs or even more.

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Sweet Potatoes With Coconut Stuffing( Raangalur Peethey)

peethey

Come winter and we are ready to drool. Makar Sankranti is celebrated in the month of January, with many delicacies being made in Indian households. In Bengal, we have our sweet treats made at home namely Bhaapaa peethey(steamed rice dumplings with coconut stuffing), Bhaaja peethey( fried moong dal dumplings with coconot stuffing), puli peethey or the raangalur  peethey(Sweet potatoes stuffed with Coconut) and many others. This one is my personal favourite and I am dying to share this with you.
Makes 12 peetheys

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